Golf Clubs in Dublin

Golf is very popular in Ireland, with over 400 golf clubs throughout the island, and over 300 courses in the Republic of Ireland. Golf is regularly televised in Ireland, with both domestic and international events broadcast. Most visiting golfers who land at Dublin Airport follow a similar game plan, like cattle following the herd. They play Portmarnock Golf Club, a top-100 course just minute from the tarmac, and then scatter in all directions. Some head north to Royal Portrush and Royal County Down in Northern Ireland. Others head south to the European Club. The majority travel west to seek out their other top-100 targets, the Old Course at Ballybunion, and Lahinch. Dublin has blossomed into one of Europe's most fascinating cities. People worship at its churches and its pubs, sometimes in the same day. And savvy golfers know there's a string of quality links just north of the city. The Royal Dublin Golf Club was instituted at a meeting held at No. 19 Grafton Street in May 1885, pioneered by a Scottish banker, John Lumsden. Originally called Dublin Golf Club and was located near the Magazine Fort in the Phoenix Park. In 1889 The Club moved to its present home here on the Bull Island. Royal Dublin owns the entire golf links which covers some 65 hectares. The Bull Island is a bird sanctuary and a special amenity area with major scientific importance because of its variety of plant and wildlife. The 27-hole Portmarnock Golf Club, which dates to 1894, has hosted 13 Irish Opens in the modern era of the European Tour, crowning champions from Ben Crenshaw in 1976 to Jose Maria Olazabal in 1990 and Michael Campbell in 2003. Like Royal Dublin, the dunes of the 7,466-yard championship course at Portmarnock aren't all that inspiring. That's probably a good thing since the course demands every ounce of attention. It's got two surprises the championship routing does not, a scenic walk along the shore and an outstanding, drivable par 4. A Bernhard Langer design built in 1995, Portmarnock Golf Links doesn't have the historical pedigree of its neighboring club. Instead, the 6,444-meter course (roughly 7,050 yards) excels in offering a welcoming atmosphere and more affordable green fee. The land used to be part of the Jameson family's private golf course, developed in 1858 as one of the earliest golf courses in Ireland. Murphy calls The Island Golf Club a "pure" links. Dunes like volcanoes erupt on its best holes. The quirks in the layout -- which starts with eight consecutive par 4s can be forgiven for that very reason. County Louth Golf Club, known by the locals as Baltray, was established in 1892 at the mouth of the River Boyne. It wasn't until 1938 that architect Tom Simpson perfected this beauty, still considered one of the top-10 links golf courses in Ireland. In 1993, architect Donald Steel upgraded the design to 7,031 yards, sturdy enough to host the 2004 and 2009 Irish Opens.

Elmgreen Golf Club

Elmgreen Golf Club

Boasting 110 acres of lush green fairways and stunning views, Elmgreen Golf Centre is an 18-hole course just 10 minutes from the centre of Dublin. Designed by acclaimed Irish golf architect Eddie Hackett, Elmgreen Golf Centre first opened to the public in 1995.
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European Club

European Club

The links of The European Club is located in magnificent sand dunes on the Irish Sea about 30-miles south of Dublin. Locate Dublin midway on Ireland's east coast and then follow the coastline south to the coastal towns of Wicklow and Arklow.
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Howth Golf Club

Howth Golf Club

Howth Golf Club is located on the beautiful scenic peninsula of Howth in North-East County Dublin, Ireland and features wonderful views over the city of Dublin. Looking south, we have Dun Laoghaire, Bray and Co. Wickow, North over Co. Dublin and Co. Louth and the Sea to the East.
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